No Unsung Songs

Sonata Music

image credit: jrossol

“Many people die with their music still in them. Why is this so? Too often it is because they are always getting ready to live. Before they know it, time runs out.” Oliver Wendell Holmes

Perhaps you have music in you. Have you always wanted to write a book? Or a screenplay? Paint a paining? Or a create killer new App?

We all have something to contribute to the world. And maybe it’s not just one thing – maybe it’s a collection of things. Maybe it’s a lifetime of things. Whether or not you act on any of this this will depend greatly on whether or not you believe that you have a duty to leave a legacy. And whether, as Oliver Wendell Holmes pointed out, you refuse to wait until the timing is “perfect”.

Maybe your legacy is to create something physical – a bridge, a building, a book or a painting. Maybe your legacy is to create something that transcends time – music, great thoughts or ideas that change the future. Maybe your legacy is simply to leave your positive fingerprint on the generation that comes after you.

A legacy, by definition, is something that is bigger than it’s creator. It endures and it continues long after we’ve moved on from this earth.

So, what’s your legacy?

Whatever it is – DO IT! And DO IT NOW!

Let’s have no unsung songs. No unwritten books. Unpainted paintings. NO REGRETS!

Personal note: This summer, for reasons I still don’t fully understand, I was drawn to purchase a ukulele.  I just kept seeing them everywhere and hearing about them, so I decided that I should at least explore this strange little instrument.  I went to a music store and got the full rundown on all things ukulele from one of the staff.  Two days later, I returned to the store and bought one.

Now you need to understand that although I have a great appreciation for music – I have never had any luck with actually making it.  As a child I took guitar lessons which were frustrating and painful.  In high school I tried my hand at singing onstage at a school variety show. All I can say about that experiment is THANK GOD it was before everyone had a video camera in their pocket!! But the ukulele was different.  Only four strings, light, small and really easy to learn (see a TED talk from Josh Kaufman that backs me up on this.)

When my kids saw the ukulele they were super intrigued.  My son wanted me to show him how to play.  Within a single evening he could play seven songs! He declared that he wanted his own ukulele for his birthday which was just a few days away.  So we went back to the music store and got a second one.  And within a week we had returned for a third one so that my daughter could play too.

There is something so magical about the three of us all playing and singing the same song!

And last night, I was by myself and decided to look for more songs that I could learn.  I remembered the old country songs that my father loved when I was a kid.  A quick internet search and I was playing Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson songs that my dad used to sing to me as he bounced me on his knee. The next time my kids are with me – guess what songs I’m going to teach them?

My father died in 2000.  My kids never got to meet him. And yet, thirteen years later, I am creating a link between my father and his grandkids through music. (Thanks for the legacy Dad! xo)

What about you? If you’re just not sure what you want to do – I recommend you check out my online course – Dreamstorming.

It’s a self-paced online course designed to help you get in touch with your true dreams. To discover and uncover the things that mean the most to you. It focused on six main areas:

  • Finances
  • Health & Fitness
  • Relationships
  • Career
  • Lifestyle
  • Legacy

Please – do yourself (and the world) a favour – don’t die with your music still inside of you!

1 Comment

  1. Thanks for the tip! Listened to the TED talk about 20 hours to learn anything. Kinda removes some barriers. Thanks again!

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